The internet truly is the great tool, as it had been proven so many times.

As long as one has access, the online world provides an undiscriminating platform for anyone to share their inner most thoughts, political slant or dancing cat videos. Everything is accepted, as an example, it’s how Justin Beiber got famous.

In the information age, content is king and sites like YouTube allow people to share everything from the sublime to the mundane, and some surprising creators are turning that content into serious cash.

YouTube allows people to monetise their channel by putting advertisements in front of their videos. Google takes solid 45 per cent of the ad generated revenue, leaving the rest to the creator of the video — depending on the engagement with the ad, 1,000 views can earn you somewhere between $1 to $5.

With such an even split it can be very difficult to make any genuine money from YouTube but one mysterious woman has made nearly $6 million last year (US $4.9 million) from YouTube ads alone.

What amazing strategy did she produce to captivate such a huge audience you ask?

She opened Disney toys.

Yep. While some of the top earning YouTube accounts include the established entertainment powers of EMI Music and the WWE, this mysterious woman has beaten them all out.
Her channel, DisneyCollector BR, consists of hundreds of videos of a pair of nail-polished hands “unboxing” everything from My Little Pony figurines to Disney-themed Play-Doh.Each video last around five minutes and never strays from the product as a cute little voice guides the viewer through the delicate unveiling of each toy and the ensuing demonstration of its features.

The account has 3,487,218 subscribers, with her top video, “Play Doh Sparkle Princess,” notching a staggering 178,415,686 views and contributing to the mind-boggling total of 4,767,605,816 views across the channel (certainly more by the time you’ve finished reading this).

With the tech-savviness of toddlers these days, it stands to reason that a bulk of the channel’s viewership is young children that love watching the same videos over and over again. A brief scroll through some of the poorly spelt comments consisting of frequent admissions of love seems to support this notion.

It may seem perplexing but the trend of “unboxing” products on YouTube is one that has steadily grown in popularity with YouTube seeing a 57 per cent increase in unboxing videos from 2013 to 2014.

DisneyCollectBR is just the first person to target the youngest demographic with such success.

While the woman’s identity remains a mystery, the New York Times traced the videos back to a 21-year-old woman in New York while Buzzfeed’s “best guess” is a 43-year-old Brazilian woman who lives near DisneyWorld in Florida Whoever she may be, the one thing that is abundantly clear is: she’s a genius. And a wealthy one at that.

 

One of the new changes from this year in Facebook is represented by the amount of video present on the news feed, amount that has tripled since last year, to the joy of many users and advertisers who discovered this option.

There is only one person who can foresee who big will the video be on the social network, and that is Fidju Simo, the Director of Product in charge of video. Simo and her team are planning to tweak the website’s design in order to facilitate the way marketers can buy video ads and allow them to monitor their campaigns.   Her efforts are central to Facebook tapping the U.S. online-video advertising market, which is estimated according to EMarketer Inc. to  reach $7.8 billion this year, up 30 percent from $6 billion in 2014.

Facebook

“We’re just really at the beginning of understanding what video on Facebook is about,” Simo said. “We want to make sure that we’re really communicating on how people are engaging with video so marketers can really understand.”

Facebook has released a progress report  about video on the social network, including how users and brands have boosted the amount of video in the news feed by 3.6 times in the past year. In addition, the number of video posts per person has jumped 75 percent, with more than half of daily U.S. visitors watching at least one video a day, the company said. Facebook Chief Executive Officer Mark Zuckerberg said in a November public question-and-answer session that in five years, most of Facebook will be video.

Facebook now has to create new metrics for marketers to evaluate their video-ad campaigns, including how many people clicked on a link at the end of a video.

Facebook doesn’t break out revenue from video ads, for which it has been charging $1 million or more a day for 15-second spots, people familiar with the situation have said.

Facebook “is coming on strong and has the potential to put pressure on YouTube,” according to an EMarketer report  that said social media will change the rules for video advertising.

Facebook has been taking more steps to improve video ads. In September, the company unveiled an ad server tool called Atlas to let marketers get data on how often individuals saw ads and on what device -- something that’s essential for video now that 65 percent of Facebook’s video is viewed via mobile devices. In July, Facebook also agreed to acquire startup LiveRail, which will help it serve video advertisements outside of the social network.

“LiveRail will make it so that publishers can be more efficient, and Atlas can help them understand how it helped their business,” said Brian Boland, a vice president focused on ads at Facebook.

As Facebook Director states, this is really the year wherea lot of investment and advertisers are now embracing the fact that we are big in video and new investments will be made in this direction.  If you are interested in having a collaboration with a professional video marketing company, please do not hesitate to contact us!